Pen Tool – Curves

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You create a curve by adding an anchor point where a curve changes direction, and dragging the direction lines that shape the curve. The length and slope of the direction lines determine the shape of the curve.

Curves are easier to edit and your system can display and print them faster if you draw them using as few anchor points as possible. Using too many points can also introduce unwanted bumps in a curve. Instead, draw widely spaced anchor points, and practice shaping curves by adjusting the length and angles of the direction lines.

  • Select the Pen tool.
  • Position the Pen tool where you want the curve to begin, and hold down the mouse button.

    The first anchor point appears, and the Pen tool pointer changes to an arrowhead. (In Photoshop, the pointer changes only after you’ve started dragging.)

  • Drag to set the slope of the curve segment you’re creating, and then release the mouse button.

    In general, extend the direction line about one third of the distance to the next anchor point you plan to draw. (You can adjust one or both sides of the direction line later.)

    Hold down the Shift key to constrain the tool to multiples of 45°.

    Drawing the first point in a curve

    Drawing the first point in a curve


    A. Positioning Pen tool B. Starting to drag (mouse button pressed) C. Dragging to extend direction lines 

  • Position the Pen tool where you want the curve segment to end, and do one of the following:

    • To create a C‑shaped curve, drag in a direction opposite to the previous direction line. Then release the mouse button.
    Drawing the second point in a curve

    Drawing the second point in a curve


    • To create an S‑shaped curve, drag in the same direction as the previous direction line. Then release the mouse button.
    Drawing an S curve

    Drawing an S curve


    Note:

    (Photoshop only) To change the direction of the curve sharply, release the mouse button, and then Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) the direction point in the direction of the curve. Release the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) key and the mouse button, reposition the pointer where you want the segment to end, and drag in the opposite direction to complete the curve segment.

  • Continue dragging the Pen tool from different locations to create a series of smooth curves. Note that you are placing anchor points at the beginning and end of each curve, not at the tip of the curve.

    Note:

    Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) direction lines to break out the direction lines of an anchor point.

  • Complete the path by doing one of the following:

    • To close the path, position the Pen tool over the first (hollow) anchor point. A small circle appears next to the Pen tool pointer  when it is positioned correctly. Click or drag to close the path.

      note: To close a path in InDesign, you can also select the object and choose Object > Paths > Close Path.

    • To leave the path open, Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) anywhere away from all objects.

      To leave the path open, you can also select a different tool, or choose Select > Deselect in Illustrator or Edit >Deselect All in InDesign.

Pen Tool

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Those who are new to Illustrator there’s a icon with a Pen.

Here’s how to use it

 

  • Select the Pen tool.
  • Position the Pen tool where you want the straight segment to begin, and click to define the first anchor point (do not drag).

    Note:

    The first segment you draw will not be visible until you click a second anchor point. (Select the Rubber Band option in Photoshop to preview path segments.) Also, if direction lines appear, you’ve accidentally dragged the Pen tool; choose Edit > Undo, and click again.

  • Click again where you want the segment to end (Shift-click to constrain the angle of the segment to a multiple of 45°).
  • Continue clicking to set anchor points for additional straight segments.

    The last anchor point you add always appears as a solid square, indicating that it is selected. Previously defined anchor points become hollow, and deselected, as you add more anchor points.

  • Complete the path by doing one of the following:

    • To close the path, position the Pen tool over the first (hollow) anchor point. A small circle appears next to the Pen tool pointer  when it is positioned correctly. Click or drag to close the path.

      note: To close a path in InDesign, you can also select the object and choose Object > Paths > Close Path.

    • To leave the path open, Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) anywhere away from all objects.

      To leave the path open, you can also select a different tool, or choose Select > Deselect in Illustrator or Edit >Deselect All in InDesign. In InDesign or Illustrator, you can also simply press Enter or Return to leave the path open.

     

 

Zoom tool

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Those who are new to Illustrator there’s a icon with a magnifying glass, that’s called the zoom tool. when you click on the screen it’ll get bigger, but when you hold down the SHIFT key you be able to zoom out. This tool is useful for looking for anything that looks off on your image.

File names – Gifs

When going on the Internet these days, you tend to find animated photos or images, these are called GIFs.

A GIF file is an image file often used for web graphics. It may contain up to 256 indexed colors with a color palette that may be a predefined set of colors or may be adapted to the colors in the image. GIF files are saved in a lossless format, meaning the clarity of the image is not compromised with GIF compression.

Makerbot

Last week, I’d use a 3d printing machine called MakerBot. This printer allow you to print any 3 dimensional object that you made on Tinkercad. when you insert the data that you have on your flash drive you are able two make a figure of that object. But how big you wanted to be affects the time that will be finish. My was about an hour or two and I’m surprise that I never knew about this printer before.

 

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MakerBot Replictor

The Perspective Grid Tool

Perspective Grid is a network of lines, drawn or superimposed on a photograph, to represent the perspective of a systematic network of lines on the ground or datum plane.

The Perspective Grid tool is a interesting tool but hard to used if you don’t know how to use it. but lucky I figure out a thing or two about this tool.  You can place your artwork on the grid itself, also you can adjust the grid by clicking and dragging the points to stretch the grid open. Also while holding down the Shift key you can constrains the movement to the extent of cell size.

Adjusting the left and right grid planes in a two-point perspective

The Perspective Grid being adjusted. 

https://helpx.adobe.com/illustrator/using/perspective-drawing.html